Tree People Love

loving Earth and Bozena


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the many ways to cycle through life

I really feel like talking about things, you know those every day things that can sometimes seem worthless, that can make a person feel like a hoarder.  I used to say that I’m not a hoarder, that I’m just waiting for a bigger house.  In truth, I just feel horrible when I throw something out knowing that it will end up in a landfill adding to all the other unwanted things in an unsuccessful tetris game.  But hey, you know what?  Someone can see old bicycle chains, but to someone else they stretch into a beautiful chandelier.

by Carolina Fontoura Alzaga

Now, is that really being frugal or is it thoughtful and practical?

To many there is only two choices:  recycle or landfill, but in truth there is a whole 6 options!  There is a whole concept of waste minimization by which waste can be organized into 6 categories with prevention being the most preferable and disposal the least.

Prevention:  by far the best option!  How can you prevent something as a tiny being on this big dear Earth?  First, you can start using reusable bags.  This will cause a chain of events that can alter our future forever:  the store cashier will not give you a plastic bag, leaving a few more bags at the counter; the manager will put in his order a bit later than usual; the bag manufacturer will lower his supply of bags and purchase less petroleum or natural gas needed to make the bag; the energy market will see less demand for energy and less permits will be given to oil and natural gas drillers because of lower demand.  And all “because a little bug went ka-choo!”  Other ideas are requesting less packing materials when purchasing items online, use towels or sponges for cleaning, dress your LO in cloth diapers, and definitely think about investing in rechargeable batteries.

Minimization:  our second best option, encourages people to optimize their resources by donating things they no longer need or use (have you heard of Freecycle?) or avoiding purchases of novelties.  Another way is skipping the middleman – instead of buying toys online that are shipped with unnecessary packaging with tons of packing materials, you can find similar toys available on Freecycle or in your closest thrift shop.  Last, but not least is to reduce waste by simply printing documents on double-sided paper.  Easy, right?

Reuse:  ok, so your wonderful useful toaster that you religiously used for the past 5 years just died on you; you can either buy a new toaster or fix the one you have.  Of course the latter is the eco friendly option, but it might cost you more.  The corresponding issue with fixing something is that nowadays it is becoming easier and cheaper to just buy something new; but can you guess why that is?  Well, it is all because most items are made in China or some other developing country that has unbelievably disproportionate salaries of its “blue-collar” workers compared to the everyday living expenses.  If you choose to get something fixed here, in your local repair shop, you will have to consider the fair salary that gets incorporated in the final price of repairing the product.

Recycling:  probably the simplest task for a non-environmentalist.   The only problem with this one is that many counties, especially rural, recycle only a small percentage of the total waste generated.  Many times a person who is eager and determined to recycle something, has to put in extra energy to find out when and where to recycle those special items like plastic bags, unconventional plastics, batteries, mercury thermometers, etc.  For all my questions about recycling, I just visit Earth911.com which allows me to find a pick-up center for almost any type of item, even batteries!

Energy Recovery:  is something that I wrote about in one of my earlier posts.  In that post I discussed the Puente Hills landfill that manufactures energy from the methane gas produced by decomposition.   But energy recovery does not have to be so distant as a landfill.  You can recover energy by composting in your backyard in late fall after the last harvest, which will fertilize your soil into the next year to yield beautiful nourished crops for you and your family.  And you don’t only have to include food waste, but also leaves, paper, and anything else that is fairly quick to biodegrade.  Here is a wonderful guide on what you can compost and what effect it will have on the soil.

I really encourage you to read more on this topic, it’s an eye opener.

Disposal:  the one method we always should try to avoid.  Just think about it, the world population is growing exponentially and more and more countries are developing into first world powers.  People are becoming wealthier, spending more on things that they don’t need, and ultimately, generating more waste.  Disposal of anything should be a moral issue, especially disposing things that don’t biodegrade like Styrofoam.   I guess we can talk about the dangers of these materials in a later topic, but I hope I encouraged you to look at waste management in a totally new light.

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The wheels of imagination are turning, people are upcycling, recycling, bicycling.  The world is a better place.

Sources:

http://www.calrecycle.ca.gov/reducewaste/Home/

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about a necklace

I’m working on a big topic now for this blog, which is taking me longer than I thought.  I recently read somewhere that great ideas and insights usually come late at night when you release your concentration and let your mind sink into total ambivalence.  The logic to this is that when you let go and reevaluate, you start looking at a problem “outside the box”.  The step essential in this process is letting go.

Sometimes it’s difficult to let go.  As humans, we instinctively prefer familiar rather than strange because the latter suggests danger, whether it’d be emotional or physical; we like to predict the future.  And this instinct for familiarity is contradictory to personal evolution – how can a person grow without taking chances and being impulsive?  I once heard a story on RadioLab about a man who had a brain tumor removed, inadvertently causing him to lose his ability to make impulsive decisions.  This condition ultimately caused him to spend hours in a supermarket trying to decide which cereal to buy.  My point is that impulsion does wonders in small doses.  Just think about it, you primarily make rational decisions in your life by eating, going to work, crossing the road on a green light, watering your plants, servicing your car, etc, etc.  But sometimes we only lack the smallest raindrop of courage that can change our whole life.  Courage is evolution.

I had a big epiphany a few months ago, when my husband and I visited a bonsai tree farm.  The owner of the farm was a quiet man in his sixties who was an enlightened artist and a bonsai lover.  He inherited many of his trees from old friends and he exulted at the ages of his favorite specimens.  Our stop at his farm was totally impromptu and we were walking around it a few minutes before Jay came out of his house and greeted us with a warm and content smile.  He patiently began touring us around his garden, showing his prized possessions.  I really wanted to buy a tree as a souvenir of our impulsive and rewarding decision to turn around into the parking lot that plainly said “Bonsai Trees”.  As we were walking around the garden, we stopped by a miniature ivy and I knew she was the one.  Her stem curled into a 7 and she had the tiniest little leaves that followed the branches like paws.  And then Jay told me something that really made me reevaluate everything that I know; he told me that the secret of a bonsai is training.  So aside from manipulating the branches to form pleasant shapes, a grower must also train the leaves.  This is done by cutting those that grow too big and leaving the tiny ones.  That way after a few years of discipline, the bonsai tree will only grow small leaves.  He concluded by saying that although some house plants love the sun, many of them die when taken out of the house for the first time after winter.  This is because their leaves are very tender from the sunless room it lived in during the winter and they need time to adapt to direct sunlight; they should be taken out gradually with shade first, direct sunlight last.  I was in awe.  I never knew that plants adapted to their surroundings, just like people.  I realized also that a person can be trained to do anything, just like the plants.  There is a Russian tradition called “zakalyanie”, which means to gradually train the body, whether it is become insensitive to germs or to function in cold temperatures.  The latter is more exciting though – people train by running naked in the snow and swimming in ice-cold water.  This helps a person not be sensitive to cold winters and remain in good health throughout the year.  So People, get out there, train yourself to do something that you thought was impossible.  It is possible.  Everything is.

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I was going to write about one idea, but ended up with a whole necklace!  Speaking of necklaces, during my “letting it go” time, I finally completed a forgotten project of mine.  I made this wonderful crocheted necklace  from two very thin strands of cotton thread and, of course, a little bit of love.

-Tree People Love